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February 2, 2014 at 1:01am
8 notes
Reblogged from lazinefest
lazinefest:

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Melt Brianna
What was your first zine about and when was it made?
My first zine was my “make it yourself-crochet”; a visual guide. I made it for a workshop I was doing at o.c. diy fest in 2009. I still distribute that zine to this day, and i also made the o.c. diy fest zine that was distributed at the fest. I think that was my first experience of mass produced and distributed zines. shout out to santa ana fnb! r.i.p.; many fond memories there.
Describe your most recent zine.
I have two most recent zines that I am going to introduce at LA Zine Fest this year. They are both follow ups to zines I have made in the past. I am making a second edition of “things my friends say”, and i am excited about this one because I have made some new friends that are going to be included, and my old friends are going to reappear. The second zine is going to be a follow up issue to my most recent semi-comical, semi-autobigraphical “Jam Slam” series. It’s going to recap the end of 2013 and introduce 2014 through my world lens.
Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest Blog!

lazinefest:

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Melt Brianna

What was your first zine about and when was it made?

My first zine was my “make it yourself-crochet”; a visual guide. I made it for a workshop I was doing at o.c. diy fest in 2009. I still distribute that zine to this day, and i also made the o.c. diy fest zine that was distributed at the fest. I think that was my first experience of mass produced and distributed zines. shout out to santa ana fnb! r.i.p.; many fond memories there.

Describe your most recent zine.

I have two most recent zines that I am going to introduce at LA Zine Fest this year. They are both follow ups to zines I have made in the past. I am making a second edition of “things my friends say”, and i am excited about this one because I have made some new friends that are going to be included, and my old friends are going to reappear. The second zine is going to be a follow up issue to my most recent semi-comical, semi-autobigraphical “Jam Slam” series. It’s going to recap the end of 2013 and introduce 2014 through my world lens.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest Blog!

January 30, 2014 at 10:00am
9 notes
Reblogged from lazinefest
lazinefest:

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Fluxus Los Angeles Projects
Describe your most recent zine.
Most recently I’ve been working on a project called L.A. La Luz, a mapping project of my favorite LED signs throughout the city. I know it may sound silly at first, but there’s something enchanting about these ephemeral, yet semi-permanent monuments that are completely pervasive throughout the city. It’s definitely made me pay more attention to my surroundings as I look for them. Some are flashy and bizarre, for example, a pixelated animation of scissors cutting a boy’s hair. I also love how many languages I see them in, and how many signs I can’t read. The signs help me remember that there is no “prototypical” Los Angeles resident and I hope that the zine does that as well.
I’ve also been working on a zine about Joshua Tree and what it means to retreat from an urban space, but that’s for another interview…
Read the rest of the interview at the LA Zine Fest blog!

lazinefest:

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Fluxus Los Angeles Projects

Describe your most recent zine.

Most recently I’ve been working on a project called L.A. La Luz, a mapping project of my favorite LED signs throughout the city. I know it may sound silly at first, but there’s something enchanting about these ephemeral, yet semi-permanent monuments that are completely pervasive throughout the city. It’s definitely made me pay more attention to my surroundings as I look for them. Some are flashy and bizarre, for example, a pixelated animation of scissors cutting a boy’s hair. I also love how many languages I see them in, and how many signs I can’t read. The signs help me remember that there is no “prototypical” Los Angeles resident and I hope that the zine does that as well.

I’ve also been working on a zine about Joshua Tree and what it means to retreat from an urban space, but that’s for another interview…

Read the rest of the interview at the LA Zine Fest blog!

January 28, 2014 at 8:40am
34 notes
The third annual LA Zine Fest Reading is just one of the totally fun event filling in the week before the event. LA Zine Week (Feb. 8 to 15) starts with a DUM DUM Zine issue release party and ends with the above reading but there are SO MANY GOOD THINGS in between:
a Valentine’s Day visual reading by six of the city’s BEST comic book artists,
an issue release party for the first zine on Fair Dig Press—Don’t Hide Behind Your Skirt by Aurora Lady,
a reading/release party organized my Tomas Mother-Effing Moniz (Rad Dad zine) and including perfomers, zinesters, writers of the highest caliber at indie book- and zinestore, AndPens Press, 
a house show by two zine bands, Wulfen Rag and Summer Vacation, courtesy of our friends at Razorcake, 
and that’s not all ! 
There are always few more events that sneak in there at the end, so follow the blog or like LA Zine Week on Facebook to be sure you’re clued in to the goings-on. All the events listed above are FREE, by the way. And I hope to see you there!

The third annual LA Zine Fest Reading is just one of the totally fun event filling in the week before the event. LA Zine Week (Feb. 8 to 15) starts with a DUM DUM Zine issue release party and ends with the above reading but there are SO MANY GOOD THINGS in between:

  • a Valentine’s Day visual reading by six of the city’s BEST comic book artists,
  • an issue release party for the first zine on Fair Dig Press—Don’t Hide Behind Your Skirt by Aurora Lady,
  • a reading/release party organized my Tomas Mother-Effing Moniz (Rad Dad zine) and including perfomers, zinesters, writers of the highest caliber at indie book- and zinestore, AndPens Press
  • a house show by two zine bands, Wulfen Rag and Summer Vacation, courtesy of our friends at Razorcake, 
  • and that’s not all ! 

There are always few more events that sneak in there at the end, so follow the blog or like LA Zine Week on Facebook to be sure you’re clued in to the goings-on. All the events listed above are FREE, by the way. And I hope to see you there!

8:38am
8 notes
Reblogged from kelseyatnowhereplace
kelseyatnowhereplace:

Pages and pages. Working on more stuff for #LAZF #owl #brushpen #comics #alwaysWIP

kelseyatnowhereplace:

Pages and pages. Working on more stuff for #LAZF
#owl #brushpen #comics #alwaysWIP

January 26, 2014 at 10:00am
2 notes

So, you’re going to LA Zine Fest….

Um, have you RSVPd for LA Zine Fest yet? Here's your chance. 

January 24, 2014 at 10:00am
97 notes
Reblogged from lazinefest
lazinefest:

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Yumi Sakugawa
Describe your work in two sentences or less.
Short comic stories and illustrated essays about the cosmos, meditation, longing, memory, and time. Personal anxieties, desires and dreams disguised in the form of beta fish, one-eyed monsters, bunny ghosts, teenage girls and extraterrestrial visitors.
How did you get involved in making zines?
I made my first coimc zine in 2008 before i even knew what a zine was. And then two years later I had the good fortune of making friends with artists who were very involved in the zine community, and that was when I learned for the first time that people actually went to different zine conventions in different cities sharing their zines with other zine-makers from all over the country. I went to my first zine convention in Sacramento in 2010 and I have been hooked ever since.
Read the rest of the interview at the LA Zine Fest blog!

So beautiful. Yumi’s work has this very serene clarity. She’s a really gifted storyteller and I can’t recommend her work enough. 

lazinefest:

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Yumi Sakugawa

Describe your work in two sentences or less.

Short comic stories and illustrated essays about the cosmos, meditation, longing, memory, and time. Personal anxieties, desires and dreams disguised in the form of beta fish, one-eyed monsters, bunny ghosts, teenage girls and extraterrestrial visitors.

How did you get involved in making zines?

I made my first coimc zine in 2008 before i even knew what a zine was. And then two years later I had the good fortune of making friends with artists who were very involved in the zine community, and that was when I learned for the first time that people actually went to different zine conventions in different cities sharing their zines with other zine-makers from all over the country. I went to my first zine convention in Sacramento in 2010 and I have been hooked ever since.

Read the rest of the interview at the LA Zine Fest blog!

So beautiful. Yumi’s work has this very serene clarity. She’s a really gifted storyteller and I can’t recommend her work enough. 

January 20, 2014 at 10:00am
62 notes
Reblogged from citylightsbooks
citylightsbooks:

A woman from the audience asks: ‘Why are there so few women on this panel? Why are there so few women in this whole week’s program? Why were there so few women among the Beat writers?’ and [Gregory] Corso, suddenly utterly serious, leans forward and says: “There were women, they were there, I knew them, their families put them in institutions, they were given electric shock. In the ’50s if you were male you could be a rebel, but if you were female your families had you locked up. There were cases, I knew them, someday someone will write about them.”  —from Stephen Scobie’s account of the Naropa Institute tribute to Ginsberg, July 1994

citylightsbooks:

A woman from the audience asks: ‘Why are there so few women on this panel? Why are there so few women in this whole week’s program? Why were there so few women among the Beat writers?’ and [Gregory] Corso, suddenly utterly serious, leans forward and says: “There were women, they were there, I knew them, their families put them in institutions, they were given electric shock. In the ’50s if you were male you could be a rebel, but if you were female your families had you locked up. There were cases, I knew them, someday someone will write about them.” —from Stephen Scobie’s account of the Naropa Institute tribute to Ginsberg, July 1994

(via skylightbooks)

January 19, 2014 at 10:00am
5 notes
Reblogged from fairdig
fairdig:

The Pop-Hop, L.A. Zine Fest & Fair Dig Press present a launch soiree for Aurora Lady's DON'T HIDE BEHIND YOUR SKIRT, as part of L.A. Zine Week! Featuring a reading by Aurora, a make-your-own-zine table by LAZF, refreshments by Plant Food for People, and more surprises!
8:00pm, Wednesday, February 12, 2014
at 5002 York Blvd, Highland Park
RSVP here!

LA Zine Week is coming!! Judging by the flyer, this event is going to be a beautiful warm sea of good feelings and vegan snacks.  

fairdig:

The Pop-Hop, L.A. Zine Fest & Fair Dig Press present a launch soiree for Aurora Lady's DON'T HIDE BEHIND YOUR SKIRT, as part of L.A. Zine Week! Featuring a reading by Aurora, a make-your-own-zine table by LAZF, refreshments by Plant Food for People, and more surprises!

8:00pm, Wednesday, February 12, 2014

at 5002 York Blvd, Highland Park

RSVP here!

LA Zine Week is coming!! Judging by the flyer, this event is going to be a beautiful warm sea of good feelings and vegan snacks.  

January 18, 2014 at 8:57am
5 notes

In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, [Do What You Love] is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

— 

Miya Tokumitsu in Slate

Just reading through a really interesting article about how this idea that if you do what you love, you’ll never work a day in your life can become a narcissistic pursuit that devalues the people who don’t have the privilege of having a job they “love.” Wags a finger at Steve Jobs and higher education, among others. 

7:21am
7 notes
Reblogged from lazinefest
lazinefest:

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Harry Diaz
Where are your favorite places in your city to look for new zines?
It’s pretty rad having access to a ton of outlets for zines in L.A. I like to hit up the usual spots like Ooga Booga, and pens. But to be honest, I find a lot of really cool zines online. Mostly by obscure artists who exist outside of the zine culture.
What are you working on for the Fest this year?
My goal is to have two new books out, one of which is a collection of 4×6 woodcuts and the other a collection of drawings. Both non-narrative and image driven books.
Read the rest of the interview at the LA Zine Fest blog!

Harry Diaz’s woodcuts are AMAZING. Love this guy’s work. 

lazinefest:

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Harry Diaz

Where are your favorite places in your city to look for new zines?

It’s pretty rad having access to a ton of outlets for zines in L.A. I like to hit up the usual spots like Ooga Booga, and pens. But to be honest, I find a lot of really cool zines online. Mostly by obscure artists who exist outside of the zine culture.

What are you working on for the Fest this year?

My goal is to have two new books out, one of which is a collection of 4×6 woodcuts and the other a collection of drawings. Both non-narrative and image driven books.

Read the rest of the interview at the LA Zine Fest blog!

Harry Diaz’s woodcuts are AMAZING. Love this guy’s work.